crystal faeries

divine love consciousness blog

krst
1st January 1970
[faeries.crosspondering]
KRST
KRYSTHL, (Crystal),
KaRaYaSaTaHaLa are the first 7 sound tones of the creation of the universe. This would be the most accurate rendition of our family name: "KRYSTHL Faeries".

While it may be most obvious that KRYST consciousness transcends judgment, and therefore is love, perhaps less obvious is that beleifs themselves can be released also, so that both precepts and percepts are released, leaving pure conscious awareness.
"Christ Consciousness" is accessed via the opened 3rd Eye.
"The light of the body is the eye: if therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light." -- Matthew 6:22

The characteristics of Christ consciousness:

Purity:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Purity \Pu"ri*ty\, n. [OE. purete, purte, OF. purt['e], F. puret['e], from L. puritas, fr. purus pure. See {Pure}.] The condition of being pure. Specifically: (a) freedom from foreign admixture or deleterious matter; as, the purity of water, of wine, of drugs, of metals. (b) Cleanness; freedom from foulness or dirt. "The purity of a linen vesture." --Holyday. (c) Freedom from guilt or the defilement of sin; innocence; chastity; as, purity of heart or of life. (d) Freedom from any sinister or improper motives or views. (e) Freedom from foreign idioms, or from barbarous or improper words or phrases; as, purity of style. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

purity n 1: being undiluted or unmixed with extraneous material [syn: {purity}, {pureness}] [ant: {impureness}, {impurity}] 2: the state of being unsullied by sin or moral wrong; lacking a knowledge of evil [syn: {purity}, {pureness}, {sinlessness}, {innocence}, {whiteness}] 3: a woman's virtue or chastity [syn: {honor}, {honour}, {purity}, {pureness}]

From Magenta Pixie

purity n 1: the Feminine counterpart to the Masculine quality of Integrity

Generosity:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Generosity \Gen`er*os"i*ty\, n. [L. generositas: cf. F. g['e]n['e]rosit['e].] 1. Noble birth. [Obs.] --Harris (Voyages). [1913 Webster] 2. The quality of being noble; noble-mindedness. [1913 Webster] Generosity is in nothing more seen than in a candid estimation of other men's virtues and good qualities. --Barrow. [1913 Webster] 3. Liberality in giving; munificence. Syn: Magnanimity; liberality. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

generosity n 1: the trait of being willing to give your money or time [syn: {generosity}, {generousness}] [ant: {stinginess}] 2: acting generously [syn: {generosity}, {unselfishness}]

Patience:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Patience \Pa"tience\ (p[=a]"shens), n. [F. patience, fr. L. patientia. See {Patient}.] 1. The state or quality of being patient; the power of suffering with fortitude; uncomplaining endurance of evils or wrongs, as toil, pain, poverty, insult, oppression, calamity, etc. [1913 Webster] Strengthened with all might, . . . unto all patience and long-suffering. --Col. i. 11. [1913 Webster] i must have patience to endure the load. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Who hath learned lowliness From his Lord's cradle, patience from his cross. --Keble. [1913 Webster] 2. The act or power of calmly or contentedly waiting for something due or hoped for; forbearance. [1913 Webster] Have patience with me, and i will pay thee all. --Matt. xviii. 29. [1913 Webster] 3. Constancy in labor or application; perseverance. [1913 Webster] He learned with patience, and with meekness taught. --Harte. [1913 Webster] 4. Sufferance; permission. [Obs.] --Hooker. [1913 Webster] They stay upon your patience. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 5. (Bot.) A kind of dock ({Rumex Patientia}), less common in America than in Europe; monk's rhubarb. [1913 Webster] 6. (Card Playing) Solitaire. [1913 Webster] Syn: {Patience}, {Resignation}. Usage: Patience implies the quietness or self-possession of one's own spirit under sufferings, provocations, etc.; resignation implies submission to the will of another. The Stoic may have patience; the Christian should have both patience and resignation. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

patience n 1: good-natured tolerance of delay or incompetence [syn: {patience}, {forbearance}, {longanimity}] [ant: {impatience}] 2: a card game played by one person [syn: {solitaire}, {patience}]

Kindness:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Kindness \Kind"ness\, n. [From {Kind}. a.] 1. The state or quality of being kind, in any of its various senses; manifestation of kind feeling or disposition beneficence. [1913 Webster] i do fear thy nature; It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Unremembered acts Of kindness and of love. --Wordsworth. [1913 Webster] 2. A kind act; an act of good will; as, to do a great kindness. Syn: Good will; benignity; grace; tenderness; compassion; humanity; clemency; mildness; gentleness; goodness; generosity; beneficence; favor. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

kindness n 1: the quality of being warmhearted and considerate and humane and sympathetic [ant: {unkindness}] 2: tendency to be kind and forgiving [syn: {forgivingness}, {kindness}] 3: a kind act [syn: {kindness}, {benignity}]

Discipline:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Discipline \Dis`ci*pline\, n. [F. discipline, L. disciplina, from discipulus. See {Disciple}.] 1. The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral. [1913 Webster] Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity. --Bacon. [1913 Webster] Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience. --C. J. Smith. [1913 Webster] 2. Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill. [1913 Webster] Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part, Obey the rules and discipline of art. --Dryden. [1913 Webster] 3. Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience. [1913 Webster] The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard. --Rogers. [1913 Webster] 4. Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc. [1913 Webster] A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate us. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 5. Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training. [1913 Webster] Giving her the discipline of the strap. --Addison. [1913 Webster] 6. The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge. --Bp. Wilkins. [1913 Webster] 7. (Eccl.) The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member. [1913 Webster] 8. (R. C. Ch.) Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge. [1913 Webster] 9. (Eccl.) A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline. Syn: Education; instruction; training; culture; correction; chastisement; punishment. [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Discipline \Dis"ci*pline\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disciplined}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disciplining}.] [Cf. LL. disciplinarian to flog, fr. L. disciplina discipline, and F. discipliner to discipline.] 1. To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train. [1913 Webster] 2. To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill. [1913 Webster] Ill armed, and worse disciplined. --Clarendon. [1913 Webster] His mind . . . imperfectly disciplined by nature. --Macaulay. [1913 Webster] 3. To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct. [1913 Webster] Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly? --Shak. [1913 Webster] 4. To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon. Syn: To train; form; teach; instruct; bring up; regulate; correct; chasten; chastise; punish. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

discipline n 1: a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings" [syn: {discipline}, {subject}, {subject area}, {subject field}, {field}, {field of study}, {study}, {bailiwick}] 2: a system of rules of conduct or method of practice; "he quickly learned the discipline of prison routine"; "for such a plan to work requires discipline"; 3: the trait of being well behaved; "he insisted on discipline among the troops" [ant: {indiscipline}, {undiscipline}] 4: training to improve strength or self-control 5: the act of punishing; "the offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received" [syn: {discipline}, {correction}] v 1: develop (children's) behavior by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control; "Parents must discipline their children"; "Is this dog trained?" [syn: {discipline}, {train}, {check}, {condition}] 2: punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience; "The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently" [syn: {discipline}, {correct}, {sort out}]

Conservation:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Conservation \Con`ser*va"tion\, n. [L. conservatio: cf. F. conservation.] The act of preserving, guarding, or protecting; the keeping (of a thing) in a safe or entire state; preservation. [1913 Webster] A step necessary for the conservation of Protestantism. --Hallam. [1913 Webster] A state without the means of some change is without the means of its conservation. --Burke. [1913 Webster] {Conservation of areas} (Astron.), the principle that the radius vector drawn from a planet to the sun sweeps over equal areas in equal times. {Conservation of energy}, or {Conservation of force} (Mech.), the principle that the total energy of any material system is a quantity which can neither be increased nor diminished by any action between the parts of the system, though it may be transformed into any of the forms of which energy is susceptible. --Clerk Maxwell. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

conservation n 1: an occurrence of improvement by virtue of preventing loss or injury or other change [syn: {conservation}, {preservation}] 2: the preservation and careful management of the environment and of natural resources 3: (physics) the maintenance of a certain quantities unchanged during chemical reactions or physical transformations

Diligence:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Diligence \Dil"i*gence\, n. [F. diligence, L. diligentia.] 1. The quality of being diligent; carefulness; careful attention; -- the opposite of negligence. [1913 Webster] 2. Interested and persevering application; devoted and painstaking effort to accomplish what is undertaken; assiduity in service. [1913 Webster] That which ordinary men are fit for, i am qualified in; and the best of me is diligence. --Shak. [1913 Webster] 3. (Scots Law) Process by which persons, lands, or effects are seized for debt; process for enforcing the attendance of witnesses or the production of writings. [1913 Webster] {To do one's diligence}, {give diligence}, {use diligence}, to exert one's self; to make interested and earnest endeavor. [1913 Webster] And each of them doth all his diligence To do unto the fest['e] reverence. --Chaucer. Syn: Attention; industry; assiduity; sedulousness; earnestness; constancy; heed; heedfulness; care; caution. -- {Diligence}, {Industry}. Industry has the wider sense of the two, implying an habitual devotion to labor for some valuable end, as knowledge, property, etc. Diligence denotes earnest application to some specific object or pursuit, which more or less directly has a strong hold on one's interests or feelings. A man may be diligent for a time, or in seeking some favorite end, without meriting the title of industrious. Such was the case with Fox, while Burke was eminent not only for diligence, but industry; he was always at work, and always looking out for some new field of mental effort. [1913 Webster] The sweat of industry would dry and die, But for the end it works to. --Shak. [1913 Webster] Diligence and accuracy are the only merits which an historical writer ascribe to himself. --Gibbon. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

diligence n 1: conscientiousness in paying proper attention to a task; giving the degree of care required in a given situation 2: persevering determination to perform a task; "his diligence won him quick promotions"; "frugality and industry are still regarded as virtues" [syn: {diligence}, {industriousness}, {industry}] 3: a diligent effort; "it is a job requiring serious application" [syn: {application}, {diligence}]

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) [bouvier]:

DILIGENCE. In Scotland, there are certain forms of law, whereby a creditor endeavors to make good his payment, either by affecting the person of his debtor, or by securing the subjects belonging to him from alienation, or by carrying the property of these subjects to himself. They are either real or personal. 2. Real diligence is that which is proper to heritable or real rights,. and of this kind there are two sorts: 1. Inhibitions. 2. Adjudication, which the law has substituted in the place of apprising. 3. Personal diligence is that by which the person of the debtor may be secured, or his personal estate affected. Ersk. Pr. L. Scotl. B. 2, t. 11, s. 1.

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) [bouvier]:

DILIGENCE, contracts. The doing things in proper time. 2. It may be divided into three degrees, namely: ordinary diligence, extraordinary diligence, and slight diligence. It is the reverse of negligence. (q.v.) Under that article is shown what degree of negligence, or want of diligence, will make a party to a contract responsible to the other. Vide Story, Bailm. Index h.t.; Ayl. Pand. 113 1 Miles, Rep. 40.

Humility:

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Humility \Hu*mil"i*ty\, n.; pl. {Humilities}. [OE. humilite, OF. humilit['e], humelit['e], F. humilit['e], fr. L. humiliatis. See {Humble}.] 1. The state or quality of being humble; freedom from pride and arrogance; lowliness of mind; a modest estimate of one's own worth; a sense of one's own unworthiness through imperfection and sinfulness; self-abasement; humbleness. [1913 Webster] Serving the Lord with all humility of mind. --Acts xx. 19. [1913 Webster] 2. An act of submission or courtesy. [1913 Webster] With these humilities they satisfied the young king. --Sir J. Davies. Syn: Lowliness; humbleness; meekness; modesty; diffidence. Usage: {Humility}, {Modesty}, {Diffidence}. Diffidence is a distrust of our powers, combined with a fear lest our failure should be censured, since a dread of failure unconnected with a dread of censure is not usually called diffidence. It may be carried too far, and is not always, like modesty and humility, a virtue. Modesty, without supposing self-distrust, implies an unwillingness to put ourselves forward, and an absence of all over-confidence in our own powers. Humility consists in rating our claims low, in being willing to waive our rights, and take a lower place than might be our due. It does not require of us to underrate ourselves. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

humility n 1: a disposition to be humble; a lack of false pride; "not everyone regards humility as a virtue" [syn: {humility}, {humbleness}] [ant: {conceit}, {conceitedness}, {vanity}] 2: a humble feeling; "he was filled with humility at the sight of the Pope" [syn: {humility}, {humbleness}] [ant: {pride}, {pridefulness}]

From Lazaris (channelled by Jach Pursel):

humility n 1: being willing to see others as new in each moment (rather than continuing to relate with them as who you previously knew them to previously be)

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