crystal faeries

divine love consciousness blog

domicile
1st January 1970
[geodesic-dome-home]

Domicil(e)

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Domicile \Dom"i*cile\, n. [L. domicilium; domus house + (prob.) root of celare to conceal: cf. F. domicile. See {Dome}, and {Conceal}.]
1. An abode or mansion; a place of permanent residence, either of an individual or a family. [1913 Webster]

2. (Law) A residence at a particular place accompanied with an intention to remain there for an unlimited time; a residence accepted as a final abode. --Wharton. [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

Domicile \Dom"i*cile\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Domiciled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Domiciling}.] [Cf. F. domicilier. Cf. {Domiciliate}.] To establish in a fixed residence, or a residence that constitutes habitancy; to domiciliate. --Kent. [1913 Webster]

From WordNet (r) 3.0 (2006) [wn]:

domicile
n 1: (law) the residence where you have your permanent home or principal establishment and to where, whenever you are absent, you intend to return; every person is compelled to have one and only one domicile at a time; "what's his legal residence?" [syn: {domicile}, {legal residence}]
2: housing that someone is living in; "he built a modest dwelling near the pond"; "they raise money to provide homes for the homeless" [syn: {dwelling}, {home}, {domicile}, {abode}, {habitation}, {dwelling house}]
v 1: make one's home in a particular place or community; "may parents reside in Florida" [syn: {reside}, {shack}, {domicile}, {domiciliate}]

From Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0 [moby-thesaurus]:

65 Moby Thesaurus words for "domicile":
abide, abiding place, abode, accommodations, address, bed, berth, bestow, billet, board, bunk, cantonment, cohabit, commorancy, crash pad, crib, diggings, digs, domiciliate, domus, doss down, dwell, dwelling, dwelling place, entertain, establish, habitation, hang out, harbor, home, house, housing, hut, inhabit, live, living quarters, locate, lodge, lodging, lodging place, lodgings, lodgment, nest, occupy, pad, perch, place, place to live, put up, quarter, remain, reside, residence, residency, roof, room, roost, seat, settle, shelter, situate, squat, stable, stay, tenant

From Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856) [bouvier]:

DOMICIL. The place where a person has fixed her ordinary dwelling, without a present intention of removal. 10 Mass. 488; 8 Cranch, 278; Ersk. Pr. of Law of Scotl. B. 1, tit. 2, s. 9; Denisart, tit. Domicile, 1, 7, 18, 19; Voet, Pandect, lib. 5, tit. 1, 92, 97; 5 Madd. Ch. R. 379; Merl. Rep. tit. Domicile; 1 Binn. 349, n.; 4 Humph. 346. The law of domicil is of great importance in those countries where the maxim "actor sequitur forum rei" is applied to the full extent. Code Civil, art. 102, &c.; 1 Toullier, 318.
2. A woman cannot be without a domicil, for she is not supposed to have abandoned her last domicil until she has acquired a new one. 5 Ves. 587; 3 Robins. 191; 1 Binn. 349, n.; 10 Pick. 77. Though by the Roman law a man might abandon his domicil, and, until be acquired a new one, he was without a domicil. By fixing his residence at two different places a man may have two domicils at one and the same time; as, for example, if a foreigner, coming to this country, should establish two houses, one in New York and the, other in New Orleans, and pass one-half of the year in each; he would, for most purposes, have two domicils. But it is to be observed that circumstances which might be held sufficient to establish a commercial domicil in time of war, and a matrimonial, or forensic or political domicil in time of peace, might not be such as would establish a principal or testamentary domicil, for there is a wide difference in applying the law of domicil to contracts and to wills. Phill. on Dom. xx; 11 Pick. 410 10 Mass. 488; 4 Wash. C. C. R. 514.
3. There are three kinds of domicils, namely: 1. The domicil of origin. domicilium originis vel naturale. 2. The domicil by operation of law, or necessary domicil. 3. Domicil of choice.
4.-1. By domicil of origin is understood the home of a man's parents, not the place where, the parents being on a visit or journey, a child happens to be born. 2 B. & P. 231, note; 3 Ves. 198. Domicil of origin is to be distinguished from the accidental place of birth. 1 Binn. 349.
5.-2. There are two classes of persons who acquire domicil by operation of law. 1st. Those who are under the control of another, and to whom the law gives the domicil of another. Among these are, 1. The wife. 2. The minor. 3. The lunatic, &c. 2d. Those on whom the state affixes a domicil. Among this class are found, 1. The officer. 2. The prisoner, &c.
6.-1st. Among those who, being under the control of another, acquire such person's domicil, are, 1. The wife. The wife takes the domicil of her husband, and the widow retains it, unless she voluntarily change it, or unless, she marry a second time, when she takes the domicil of the second husband. A party may have two domicils, the one actual, the other legal; the husband's actual and the wife's legal domicil, are, prima facie, one. Addams' Ecc. R. 5, 19. 2. The domicil of the minor is that of the father, or in Case of his death, of the mother. 5 Ves. 787; 2 W. & S. 568; 3 Ohio R. 101; 4 Greenl. R. 47. 3. The domicil of a lunatic is regulated by the same principles which operated in cases of minors the domicil of such a person may be changed by the direction, or with the assent of the guardian, express or implied. 5 Pick. 20.
7.-2d. The law affixes a domicil. 1. Public officers, such as the president of the United States, the secretaries and such other officers whose public duties require a temporary residence at the capital, retain their domicils. Ambassadors preserve the domicils which they have in their respective countries, and this privilege extends to the ambassador's family. Officers, soldiers, and marines, in the service of the United States, do not lose their domicils while thus employed. 2. A prisoner does not acquire a domicil where the prison is, nor lose his old. 1 Milw. R. 191, 2.
8.-3. The domicil of origin, which has already been explained, remains until another has been acquired. In order to change such domicil; there must be an actual removal with an intention to reside in the place to which the party removes. 3 Wash. C. C. R. 546. A mere intention to remove, unless such intention is carried into effect, is not sufficient. 5 Greenl. R. 143. When he changes it, he acquires a domicil in the. place of his new residence, and loses his original domicil. But upon a return with an intention to reside, his original domicil is restored. 3 Rawle, 312; 1 Gallis. 274, 284; 5 Rob. Adm. R. 99.
9. How far a settlement in a foreign country will impress a hostile character on a merchant, see Chitty's Law of Nations, 31 to 50; 1 Kent, Com. 74 to 80; 13 L. R. 296; 8 Cranch, 363; 7 Cranch, 506; 2 Cranch, 64 9 Cranch, 191; 1 Wheat. 46; 2 Wheat 76; 3 Wheat. 1 4 2 Gall. R. 268; 2 Pet. Adm. Dec. 438 1 Gall. R. 274. As to its effect in the administration of the assets of a deceased non-resident, see 3 Rawle's R. 312; 3 Pick. R. 128; 2 Kent, Com. 348; 10 Pick. R. 77. The law of Louisiana relating to the "domicil and the manner of changing the same" will be found in the Civil Code of Louisiana, tit. 2, art. 42 to 49. See, also, 8 M. R. 709; 4 N. S. 51; 6 N. S. 467; 2 L. R. 35; 4 L. R. 69; 5 N. S. 385 5 L. R. 332; 8 L. R. 315; 13 L. R. 297 11 L. R. 178; 12 L. R. 190. See, on the subject generally, Bouv. Inst. Index, h.t. 2 Bos. & Pul. 230, note 1 Mason's Rep. 411; Toullier, Droit Civil Francais, liv. 1, tit. 3, n., 362 a 378; Domat, tome 2, liv. 1, s. 3; Pothier, Introduction Generale aux Coutumes, n. 8 a 20; 1 Ashm. R. 126; Merl. Rep. tit. Domicile 3 Meriv. R. 79; 5 Ves. 786; 1 Crompt. & J. 151; 1 Tyrwh. R. 91; 2 Tyrwh. R. 475; 2 Crompt. & J. 436 3 Wheat. 14 3 Rawle, 312; 7 Cranch, 506 9 Cranch, 388; 5 Pick. 20; 1 Gallis, 274, 545; 10 Mass. 488 11 Mass. 424; 13 Mass. 501 2 Greenl. 411; 3 Greenl 229, 354; 4 Greenl. 47; 8 Greenl. 203; 5 Greenl. 143; 4 Mason, 308; 3 Wash. C. C. R. 546; 4 Wash. C. C. R. 514 4 Wend, 602; 8 Wend. 134; 5 Pick. 370 10 Pick. 77; 11 Pick. 410; 1 Binn. 349, n.; Phil. on Dom. passim.



[monolithic_round_earthquake_and_typhoon_proof_houses]

Here we have an example of the kind of construction which is unhealthy to shelter a living being. The cage of rebar ( REinforcing steel BARs) utilized to provide structural strength to conventional concrete interferes with the flow of life force energy. The conductive metal dome is not the most biocompatible.



[the_newest_dome_house_with_high_technology_in_the_21th_century]

Here we have an example of a kind of construction which is not perfectly healthy to shelter a living being. The interior of polystyrene insulating plastic utilized to provide structural strength to conventional concrete interferes with the flow of life force energy. The insulating plastic dome is not the most biocompatible.



[air_crete_dome_homes-llsql2bpwqy]

Here we have an example of a kind of construction which is healthy to shelter a living being. The paramagnetic mineral "aircrete" allows the flow of life force energy. The aircrete dome is both biocompatible and durable. The other most biocompatible construction material is wood, however while wood is life force energy compatible, it is a bit too compatible, offering great attractiveness to termites, which are a serious problem here on our tropical isle of Kaua'i, and thus is not a durable option.



For our domiciles we may wish to have an off-the-grid water supply.



Faery blessings -- celeste


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